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Toscana IGT

After Piedmont and the Veneto, Tuscany produces the third highest volume of DOC/G quality wines.

Wine regions

Brunello di Montalcino

Brunello is the name of the local Sangiovese variety that is grown around the village of Montalcino. Located south of the Chianti Classico zone, the Montalcino range is drier and warmer than Chianti. Brunellos a...

After Piedmont and the Veneto, Tuscany produces the third highest volume of DOC/G quality wines.

Wine regions

Brunello di Montalcino

Brunello is the name of the local Sangiovese variety that is grown around the village of Montalcino. Located south of the Chianti Classico zone, the Montalcino range is drier and warmer than Chianti. Brunellos are characterized by rich aromatics and generous, ripe fruit, with excellent structure and fine, elegant tannins.

Chianti

Located in the central region of Tuscany, the Chianti zone is Tuscany's largest classified wine region and produces over eight million cases a year. The typical Sangiovese flavor profile tends toward and expression of red cherries, tobacco, underbrush, and grilled herbs.

Bolgheri

The DOC Bolgheri region is home to one of the original Super Tuscan wines Sassicaia, first made in 1944 produced by the marchesi Incisa della Rochetta, cousin of the Antinori family.

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Subcategories

  • Brunello di Montalcino

    Brunello di Montalcino, a DOCG wine, is considered one of the greatest, long-lived red wines in existence. It has a price-tag to match: CHF 45 to over CHF 200 a bottle (for wines by the producer Soldera).

    Brunello di Montalcino comes from a particular clone, or strain, of Sangiovese, the grape of Chianti.

    It’s an intensely concentrated, tannic wine that demands aging (up to 20 years) when traditionally made, and benefits from several hours of aeration before serving.

    The Brunello di Montalcino wines cannot be released for sale until five years after the harvest.

    Best vintages : 2001, 1999, 1997, 1995, 1990, 1988, 1985, and 1975.

  • Chianti

    Chianti is a large wine zone extending through much of Italy's Tuscany region.

    Besides varying according to their district of production, Chianti wines also vary in these ways:

    • Aging: Riserva wines must age for two years or more at the winery, and some of this aging is often in French oak; the best riservas have potential for long life.

    • Grape blend: Many top Chiantis are made almost entirely from the Sangiovese grape, while others use up to 25 percent of other varieties, including “international” varieties, such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah.

    The two exceptional vintages to look for in Chianti wines are 1999 and 2001 — two of the better Tuscan vintages of modern times.

  • Bolgheri (Sassicaia)

    Bolgheri, on the Tuscan coast just south of Livorno, is one of Italy's most prestigious vineyard areas.

    Bolgheri became an internationally known region following an event in 1974 arranged by Decanter where a 6-year-old Sassicaia won over an assortment of Bordeaux wines.

    Due to the particular characteristics of the soil and micro climate sunny, dry and moderately windy, the grape varieties of Bordeaux origin tend to thrive, such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot.



Showing 1 - 12 of 191 items -

There are 191 wines.

Showing 1 - 12 of 191 items -

There are 191 wines.

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